PAROWAN, UT – Day 8

I left Las Vegas later than I had planned, and poorer than I had
planned.  It was going to be a fairly short drive, because
nightfall was approaching and I didn’t want to miss any of the
landscape by driving in darkness.  For some time, I had been
considering the red chair and desk that I had purchased in Austin, and
which had been faithfully riding in the back of the Jeep since
Texas.  On an open stretch of highway near the Utah border, I saw
my chance.  The chance to create some art.  I even had a
title:  “Rakesh, Red Chair, Red Rocks.”  

As has often been the case, my ideas are larger than my
abilities.  Or more accurately this time around, it’s not easy to
set-up a photo on the side of a major highway as the light is
fading.  Even though there wasn’t too much traffic, the
18-wheelers zoomed at such a velocity that my car would shake as each
one passed.  On top of that, there was no flat, even surface on my
entire car upon which I could place the camera.  Add to this my
feeling foolish, as if everyone was staring as they drove by, and you
end up with this photo, re-titled now “Fuzzy Rakesh, Red Chair, Red
Rocks All Too Far Away.”  Well, I had to at least try.  And it was a nice sunset.

By nightfall, I realized that there wasn’t going to be much by way of
large towns in Utah.  So I took an exit for a place called
Parowan, and will admit that the name reminded me of the word “padowan” from
the Star Wars movies — as in, “You will stay here tonight, my young
Padowan.”  Or is it spelled “paduan”? Whatever.  So that’s how I ended up at a plain, too far from the highway,
Days Inn run by Jack Patel.  I was tempted to fill in the guest
info card as “Rick Ash” in homage to old Jack’s name adjustment, but as I was already
receiving some odd glances from the Indian lady at the reception desk,
thought better of it.  Indians in Utah, like that should be
strange?  Career choice #4 for this trip — running a motel like
other brothers.  I got the last room, oddly enough.  Parowan
is a gateway to one of the state parks popular with mountain bikers.

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